5 Questions with Louise Irwin

louise-i

This week, we are very excited to introduce you to Louise Irwin, Marketing Manager at KantanMT. Our ongoing ‘5 Questions’ series will give you a better insight into the thoughts and ideas of the people at KantanMT. Please feel free to add your questions in the comments section, if you would like them to be answered by Louise. Continue reading

Student Speak: First Time Using Machine Translation

Elodie Vermant, a Swansea University student, studying for an MA in Professional Translation, shares her experience on using Machine Translation for the first time at Swansea University.

The MLTM11 Translation Technologies Module is taught by Dr. Maria Fernandez-Parra, Lecturer, Languages, Translation and Communication at Swansea University. Read more experiences from her students.

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Student Speak: Translation Students at UAH on Using KantanMT

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University of Alacala

The  University of Alcalá (UAH), one of KantanMT’s Academic Partners used the platform to teach final year undergraduate students Custom Machine Translation during the 2015-2016 academic year.

KantanMT.com was used in the course ‘Machine Translation and Post-editing,’ which was taught for the first time in the ‘Degree in Modern Languages Applied to Translation’ in UAH. English and Spanish were the main languages used during this course.

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Student Speak: Student at UCL Chats with KantanMT Team

architecture-1122359_1920Dissemination of Machine Translation innovation is a major priority for us at KantanMT. We believe that Academic Partnerships have a huge role to play in furthering the scope of research and innovation in the field of Machine Translation, and as such we have partnered with a number of Universities to help students use the KanataMT platform in a real word scenario.

We are always looking for ways to improve the KantanMT platform, and to keep our finger on the pulse of the KantanMT user experience, we asked one of the students using the platform to answer some questions about the platform.

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Applications Of Machine Translation And Translation Memory Tools In Audiovisual Translation: A New Era?

Rafaella Athanasiadi, UCL KantanMTMaster’s student, Rafaella Athanasiadi of the University College London submitted her thesis as part of the MSc degree in Scientific, Technical and Medical Translation with Translation Technology. Rafaella was supervised by Teaching Fellow and Lecturer Dr. Emmanouela Patiniotaki and she used KantanMT.com for her research. This guest blog post looks at some of her conclusions on Machine Translation and the Localization Industry.

As Hutchins & Somers (c1992:1) argue, “the mechanization of translation has been one of humanity’s oldest dreams.” During the 20th century, the translation process changed radically. From spending endless hours in libraries to find the translation of a word, the translator has been placed in the centre of dozens of assistive tools. To name just a few, today, there are many translation software, terminology extraction tools, project management components, and machine translation systems, which translators have the opportunity to choose from while translating.

However, shifting the focus to audiovisual translation, it can be observed that not so many radical changes took place in that area, at least not until the introduction of machine translation systems in various projects (such as, the MUSA and the SUMAT project) that developed machine translation engines to optimise the subtitling process. Still, the results of such projects do not seem to be satisfactory enough to inspire confidence for the implementation of these engines in the subtitling process both by subtitling software developers and subtitlers.

Rafaella Athanasiadi, KantanMT UCLBased on my personal research that focused primarily on the European setting, in the subtitling industry it seems that only freeware SRT Translator incorporates machine translation while also offering the features that subtitling software usually incorporate (i.e. uploading multimedia files and timecoding subtitles) at the moment. Nonetheless, SRT Translator, which is not very famous among subtitlers, uses solely Google Translator by default, which is a general-domain machine translation engine and not suitable for the purposes of audiovisual translation, one could argue. The quality of the output of Google Translator was tested by translating 35 subtitles of a comedy series[1]. The output was incomprehensible and misleading in many cases.

Even though no further records of traditional subtitling software that incorporate machine translation could be found, there are many online translation platforms that allow users to upload and translate subtitles. Taking into consideration the European market, these can be either translation software like MemoQ, SDL Trados Studio and Wordfast that offer thability to load subtitle files and in some cases link them to the audiovisual content they are connected to, open source tools for translators like Google Translator Toolkit (GTT) or professional and private platforms like Transifex and XTM International that are used by companies and offered to their dedicated network of translators. Nonetheless, in order to enable machine translation in all the above applications, API keys must be purchased. GTT is an exception since it can be used for free anytime and only requires a Gmail account.

The fact that subscription fees have to be paid along with the costs of API keys for each machine translation engine provider puts their usability in question since costs may overweight subtitlers’ profits. Furthermore, these platforms cannot accommodate subtitlers’ needs; for instance, the option to upload and play multimedia files while translating the subtitles is not always possible nor any synchronization features for timecoding the subtitles to the audio track are offered. Transifex, however, is an exception since this localization platform offers users the option to upload multimedia files in the translation editor while translating the subtitles.

KantanMT Machine TranslationAccording to Macklovitch (2000:1) a translation memory is considered to be “a particular type of translation support tool that maintains a database of source and target language sentence pairs, and automatically retrieves the translation of those sentences in a new text which occur in the database.” Even though machine translation engines were developed through different projects to reduce subtitling time to the least possible degree, no attempts had been traced during this research to integrate a translation memory tool in a subtitling software for optimizing subtitling; at least in a European, Asian and Australian setting. As Smith (2013) argues, “traditionally subtitling has fallen outside the scope of translation memory packages, perhaps as it was thought to be too creative a process to benefit from the features such software offers.” However, as Diaz-Cintas (2015:638) discusses “DVD bonus material, scientific and technical documentaries, edutainment programmes, and corporate videos tend to contain the high level of lexical repetition that makes it worthwhile for translation companies to employ assisted translation and memory tools in the subtitling process.”

Even if such tools have not been integrated in subtitling software, translation memory components are used for subtitling purposes in cloud-based platforms such as GTT, Transifex and XTM International as well as in translation software, MemoQ, SDL Trados Studio, Wordfast Pro and Transit NXT by simply creating a translation memory before or while translating. It should be noted that Transit NXT is the only translation software that can accommodate the needs of subtitlers to a high level among the tools discussed in this research. Apart from the addition of specialized filters to load subtitles (that also exist in MemoQ, SDL Trados Studio and Wordfast Pro), subtitlers can upload multimedia files, translate subtitles while a translation memory component is active and also synchronise their subtitles with the Transit translation editor (Smith, 2013).

The translation editor of Transit NXT by Smith
The translation editor of Transit NXT by Smith (2013)

Figure 1: The translation editor of Transit NXT by Smith (2013)

The newly-founded company (2012) OOONA has taken a very interesting approach to subtitling by developing a unique cloud-based toolkit that is built exclusively for accommodating the needs of subtitlers. When asked the following question within the context of the MSc thesis,

Considering that other cloud-based translation platforms like GTT, Transifex and XTM International offer the option of uploading a TM or a terminology management component, do you think that it is important to offer it on a subtitling platform as well?

the representative of OOONA (Alex Yoffe) replied that not only will the company implement translation memory and terminology management components in the next phase of enhancing their platform but that they also consider these components to be very important for the subtitling process. In addition, Yoffe (2015) argued that OOONA intends to “add the option of using MT engines. Translators will be able to choose between Microsoft’s, Google’s, or customisable MT engines.” Therefore, it seems that OOONA will become a very powerful tool in the near future with features that will optimise the subtitling process to the maximum and shape the way that subtitling is carried out until now. The fact that Screen Systems, Cavena and EZTitles have partnered with OOONA is an indicator of how much potential there is in this toolkit.

As it can been argued based on the above, there is lack of subtitling software with incorporated translation memory tools. Therefore, this issue was further researched through the form of an online questionnaire that was disseminated to subtitling companies and freelance subtitlers. In addition, two companies that develop subtitling software, Screen Subtitling Systems and EZTitles, were asked to present their views on this topic. In both cases, their willingness to optimise the subtitling process in a semi-automated or a fully-automated way was apparent through their answers. The former company was in favour of a combination of machine translation tools with translation memory tools whereas the latter leaned towards a subtitling system with integrated translation memory and terminology management tools.

Nonetheless, the optimisation of the subtitling process has to coincide with the needs and preferences of subtitlers. Based on the respondents’ answers, it is clear that translation memory tools in subtitling software are desirable by subtitlers. In question,

Which tool would you prefer to have in a subtitling software? An integrated translation memory (TM) or machine translation (MT)?

more than half of the respondents (56.8%) chose TM. Interestingly, the answer Both received the second highest percentage (20.5%) which indicated that subtitlers demand as many assistive tools as possible.

One of the main conclusions that were drawn from this research was that machine translation engines need to be customised to produce good quality output and this can be achieved through customisable engines like KantanMT and Milengo. Moreover, translation memory tools are sought by subtitlers in subtitling software, while cloud-based platforms seem to occupy the translation industry today. Following this trend, subtitling software providers partner with online services/tools like the OOONA toolkit.

Based on the outcomes of this research, it could be said that we are certainly experiencing a new era in subtitling since the traditional PC-based subtitling software are now transforming into flexible and accessible platforms to enhance the subtitling experience as much as possible. It is a matter of time which tool and platform will rule the subtitling industry but one thing is for sure; the technologies of the future will bring a lot of changes in the traditional way of subtitling.

Works Cited

Diaz-Cintas, J., 2015. Technological Strides in Subtitling. In: S. Chan, ed. Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Technology. London: Routledge, pp. 632-643.

Hutchins, J. W. & Somers, H. L. (c1992). An introduction to machine translation. London: Academic Press.

Macklovitch, E. (2000). Two Types of Translation Memory. In Proceedings of the ASLIB Conference on Translating and the Computer (Vol. 22).

Smith, Steve (2013). New Subtitling Feature in Transit NXT. November 11 2013. [Online]. Available from: http://www.star-uk.co.uk/blog/subtitling/working-with-subtitles-in-transit-nxt/. [Accessed 01 Sept. 2015].

Yoffe, A (2015). MT and TM tools in subtitling. [Interview]. 13 August 2015.

[1] Relevant data are available in Appendix 1 of the MSc thesis.

 

University Speak: The Future of Translation Technology with Swansea University

A few months back we were pleased to announce our Academic Partnership with Swansea University’s Department of Languages, Translation and Communication. The postgraduate students of the department were able to use the KantanMT platform to update or gain new skills in Translation Technology. With help of the KantanMT platform, the students learnt how to build and customise their own Statistical Machine Translation (SMT) systems in a real world scenario.

The MLTM11 Translation Technologies Module aimed to broaden and deepen students’ familiarity and expertise with current translation technologies. A number of students in the programme were interested in careers in the localization industry. Interests and aspirations ranged from working as an in-house IT specialist and/or localizer, a developer and tester with a major translation tools company, or working as an academic researcher (e.g. a PhD) in the field of language technology.

Now that the course is complete and the students are ready to contribute to the world of Machine Translation, we asked them a few questions about their experience of using the platform. We also asked the lecturer from the course to tell us a little bit about her experience of working with us. Here’s a few bites from each of our brilliant KantanMT users.

Dr. Maria Fernandez-Parra, Swansea University

LecturerDr. Maria Fernandez-Parra, Languages, Translation and Communication

About Dr Fernandez-Parra:

Dr Fernandez-Parra is interested in all aspects of translation and interpreting, particularly translation technologies, translation theory, technical and specialised translation and computer-assisted translation. She is also interested in many aspects of linguistics (especially formulaic language) as well as in the teaching of Spanish in Higher Education. One of her more recent interests is the introduction of technology into teaching in Higher Education.

What does Dr Fernandez-Parra think about KantanMT?

KantanMT is very useful for teaching purposes for various reasons but one reason that stands out is that it allows lecturers to show students an example of how to train data for MT output. This is not possible with other MT tools that I know of. Students can experiment with the creation of training data for their specific source texts, as opposed to general training data that might not be too relevant to some source texts. This allows them to get the best results possible when translating with MT and it gets students familiar with the concept of training MT engines on specific datasets.

It is good that students can start learning about this concept and have some practice and experience in it, as we know there are increasingly more career opportunities in this field of work. Another advantage of KantantMT is that it is very convenient to access it online for teaching purposes, as we do not have to worry about installing anything in our university server and there are no licensing problems involved. KantanMT staff were very helpful and quick to respond to queries. The use of KantanMT online is easy and intuitive and it does not take long for students to be working with their own training data in KantanMT. In addition, there is a wide range of useful information on the web site and a variety of useful resources too.

Student: Ms Min Luo

I think CAT Tools will become more and more helpful in China.

KantanMT: What made you choose this course, and how to do you think it will help your career?

Ms Luo: I think this course is useful. It will help the translator when they translate texts containing repetition.

KantanMT: What are your thoughts on using the KantanMT platform, what did you find good and do you have any suggestions for improvement?

Ms Luo: It is good. It is convenient. I have no suggestion.

KantanMT: What is your impression of the translation industry, and in your opinion, what do you think the industry will look like in the future?

Ms Luo: Technology changes quickly. I think CAT Tools will become more and more helpful in China.

Student: Ms Gwladys Petitfrère

KantanMT.com is very different from other MT I have used before. It is very easy to use and gives great results.

KantanMT: What made you choose this course, and how to do you think it will help your career?

Ms Petitfrère: I wanted to learn how to use various CAT tools for my career as a translator, if I needed it in the future.

KantanMT: Did you have any previous experience of Machine Translation, if so how does KantanMT.com compare?

Ms Petitfrère: KantanMT.com is very different than other MT I have used before. It is very easy to use and gives great results.

KantanMT: What are your thoughts on using the KantanMT platform, what did you find good and do you have any suggestions for improvement?

Ms Petitfrère: There is a lot of information available about every possible specificity of this tool.

KantanMT: What is your impression of the translation industry, and in your opinion, what do you think the industry will look like in the future?

Ms Petitfrère: I think CAT tools are very helpful for the translator, but hopefully we won’t act as proof-readers of the text produced by a machine.

Student: Ms So Mui Cheung

I see contradictory directions. On the one hand, MT is inevitable, welcoming and the way forward.

KantanMT: What made you choose this course, and how to do you think it will help your career?

Ms Cheung: I chose this course because firstly, it offers a PG certificate option and as I already have a Masters degree connected with the language I work with, so I didn’t want to complete another Masters degree.

Secondly, from the point of view of content, I needed a course that focuses on the technology for translation work, and lots of practical hands-on work using the tools. This course meets these criteria. The course sets a direction for a new way of approaching translation. It reflects the rapid changes happening in the field.

Question: Have you had you any previous experience of Machine Translation, if yes, how did you find using the KantanMT system?

Ms Cheung: Most people who use the internet now will have some experience of using MT if only to get a gist of internet content instantly. My comment here is based on very little interaction with the KantanMT platform. It is a tool aimed not at individuals/freelance translators but corporations/language services providers. As such, unless one is engaged to do quite a lot of work or on a regular basis, then the KantanMT platform is not one where one can get the most out of in a short time, as indeed an individual translator is unlikely to have access to it.

KantanMT: What are your thoughts on using the KantanMT platform, what did you find good and do you have any suggestions for improvement?

Ms Cheung: See my comment above – as an individual translator, I can only suggest improvements after having tested the different features thoroughly. I would welcome another chance to answer this question.

KantanMT: What is your impression of the translation industry, and in your opinion, what do you think the industry will look like in the future?

Ms Cheung: Firstly, in the translation industry, at least in the language pair of Chinese>English that I work with, good quality and relevant TMs for training the engine might be a problem. However, in the future – again, in the language pair I work with, I see contradictory directions. On the one hand, MT is inevitable, welcoming and the way forward. On the other hand, depending on the nature of the work, corporations subscribing to cloud-based MT platforms such as Kantan will have issues with confidentiality, and for this reason, I expect some adaption before a cloud-based platform is a widely or readily available tool on an LSP-freelancer basis in the foreseeable future. In the meantime, I expect to see an increase in MT text for post-editing whether online or offline.

Note from the KantanMT team:

Read more about courses offered by Swansea University, or for more information on the KantanMT University Partner Program, please contact us, (info@kantanmt.com).

About Swansea University

Swansea is a top-30 UK research university (Research Excellence Framework 2014), with a record of teaching translation tools and technologies going back to 1999. Its MA in Professional Translation (formerly MA in Translation with Language Technology) has been a member of the European Master’s in Translation Network since its inception in 2009. It also offers a vocational MA in Translation and Interpreting, and a thriving PhD programme in Translation (including recent successful projects on translation tools).

Using F-Measure in Kantan BuildAnalytics

What is F-Measure ?

KantanMT Logo 800x800 F-Measure is an automated measurement that determines the precision and recall  capabilities of a KantanMT engine. F-Measure measures enables you to determine the  quality and performance of your KantanMT engine

  • To see the accuracy and performance of your engine click on the ‘F-measure Scores’ tab. You will now be directed to the ‘F-measure Scores’ page.

F-Measure tab

  • Place your cursor on the ‘F-measure Scores Chart’ to see the individual score of each segment. A pop-up will now appear on your screen with details of the segment under these headings, ‘Segment no.’, ‘Score’, ‘Source’, ‘Reference/Target’ and ‘KantanMT Output’.

Segment

  • To see the ‘F-measure Scores’ of each segment in a table format scroll down. You will now see a table with the headings ‘No’, ‘Source’, ‘Reference/Target’, ‘KantanMT Output’ and ‘Score’.
  • To see an even more in depth breakdown of a particular ‘Segment’ click on the Triangle beside the number of the segment you wish to view.Triangle
  • To reuse the engine as Test Data click on the ‘Reuse as Test Data’. When you do so, the ‘Reuse as Test Data’ button will change to ‘Delete Test Data’.Test Data
    Delete Test Data
  • To download the ‘F-measure Scores’, ‘BLEU Score’ and ‘TER Scores’ of all segments click on the ‘Download’ button on either the ‘F-measure Scores’, ‘BLEU Score’ or ‘TER Scores’ page.download

This is one of the features provided by Kantan BuildAnalytics to improve an engine’s quality after its initial training .To see other features used by Kantan BuildAnalytics please click on the link below .To get more information about KantanMT and the services we provide please contact our support team at  at info@kantanmt.com.

What is KantanISR and Why do I need it ?

KantanISR technology enables KantanMT members to perform instant segment retraining using a pop-up editor. The technology is designed to permit the near-instantaneous submission of post-edited translations into a KantanMT engine so that KantanMT members can submit segments for retraining, hence bypassing the need to completely rebuild the engine.

KantanISR was developed with usability, efficiency and productivity in mind as members simply need to login to their KantanMT account, go to their main dashboard and submit new training segments using the KantanISR Editor. This adding of high quality training data to a KantanMT engine will improve the translation quality of that engine and reduce post-editing requirements.

Using KantanISR

      1. Login into your KantanMT account using your email and your password.
      2. You will be directed to the ‘My Client Profiles’ page. You will be in the ‘Client Profiles’section of the ‘My Client Profiles’ page. The last profile you were working on will be‘Active’.
      3. If you wish to use the ‘KantanISR’ with another profile other than the ‘Active’ profile. Click on the profile you wish to use the ‘KantanISR’ with, then click on the ‘Training Data’ tab.
      4. You will be directed to the ‘Training Data’ page. Now click on the ‘IRS’ tab.
      5. The ‘KantanISR’ wizard will now pop-up on your screen.
      6. Add the source language text in the ‘Source’ text editor fields. Add the corresponding target language text in the ‘Target’ text editor fields.
      7. Then click on the ‘Save’ button if your happy with your retraining data. If not click the‘Cancel’ button.
      8. When you click the save button a ‘KantanISR successful’ pop-up will appear on your screen, click the ‘OK’ button and you will be directed back to the ‘Training Data’ page.

Using KantanISR through KantanAPI

Please Note: The KantanAPI is only available to KantanMT members in the Enterprise Plan.

Members’ can also get the benefit of KantanISR through KantanAPI by using HTTP

GET requests. The API expects:

  • A user authorisation token (‘API token’) which can be gotten by clicking on the ‘API’
  • The name of the client profile you wish to use.
  • A source segment and its target segment in the languages specified when profile was created.

To learn more about KantanISR or get help with KantanMT technologies, please contact us at info@kantanmt.com. Hear from the Development team on why KantanISR increases productivity and efficiency for KantanMT customers.

 

Why you should use KantanAnalytics

What is KantanAnalytics?

things to think about when buying MTKantanAnalytics generates quality estimation scores for automated translations generated by KantanMT engines. The better the KantanAnalytics scores – the better the quality performance of a KantanMT engine as it means translations are more accurate and fluent and require less post-editing effort.

KantanAnalytics creates a detailed project management report of all segments within a KantanMT project. This includes segment-by-segment quality estimation scores in addition to other useful project statistics such as word, character, placeholder and tag counts.

KantanAnalytics can help Project Managers make the right decision as it predicts the cost and post-editing effort for Machine Translation projects. Prioritizing the right translations through segment quality estimation will yield the fastest possible project turn-around.

How to use KantanAnalytics

  1. Login into your KantanMT account using your email and your password.
  2. You will be directed to the ‘My Client Profiles’ page. You will be in the ‘Client Profiles’ section of the ‘My Client Profiles’ page. The last profile you were working on will be ‘Active’
  3. If you wish to view the ‘KantanAnalytics’ of another profile other than the ‘Active’ profile. Click on the profile you wish to view the ‘KantanAnalytics’ of, then click on the ‘Client Files’ tab.
  4. You will now be directed to the ‘Client Files’ page.
  5. Click on the ‘Analyse’ tab.
  6. A ‘Launch Job’ pop will now appear on your screen saying your job has been launched. Note the ‘Job ID’ Click on the ‘OK’ button on the ‘Launch Job’ pop-up.
  7. You will receive an email notification stating that your job has been launched in the email address you use to register on KantanMT.com.
  8. You will also receive an email notification when the job has been completed.
  9. Click on the ‘KantanMT’ tab and select ‘My Jobs’ from the drop down menu.
  10. You will now be directed to the ‘My Jobs’ page.
  11. Search for the job using the ‘Job ID’, you can use the ‘Search Bar’ or go to the ‘#’ column and scroll till you find the ‘Job ID’.
  12. Click on the analyse Icon beside the job to view the job analysis
  13. You will now be directed to the ‘KantanAnalytics Report’ page for the job.
  14. To exit out of the ‘KantanAnalytics Report’ page click on the ‘Back to My Jobs’ button.
  15. You will be directed back to the ‘My jobs’ page.

To download the ‘KantanAnalytics’ of the job click on the download icon

Additional Information

For more details on KantanAnalytics please see the following video below:

To learn more about KantanAnalytics or get help with KantanMT technologies, please contact us at info@kantanmt.com or visit the KantanMT website. Hear from the Development team on the benefits of KantanAnalytics

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How to Guide: KantanTemplates

KantanMT HelpKantanTemplates™ gives members an intuitive and powerful way to customise, improve and deploy multiple KantanMT engines that share common training data-sets. It enables the usage of shared data-sets of bilingual and terminology training files across multiple KantanMT engines. It also provides an easier method to customise multiple Machine Translation engines and reporting tools to track progress.

How to create a KantanTemplate

  • Login into your KantanMT account using your email and your password
  • Click on the ‘KantanMT’ tab and select ‘My Templates’ from the dropdown menu.
  • You will be directed to the ‘My Templates’ page. Click on the ‘Create’ button, the ‘Create New Template Wizard’ will now pop up on your screen.
  • Give your KantanTemplate a name and click the ‘Next’ button.
  • Select a ‘Source Language’ and a ‘Target language’ and click the ‘Next’ button.
  • You will now be provided with a summary overview of your KantanTemplate, if you wish to make any changes to your KantanTemplate click on the ‘Previous’ button and make the changes.
  • If you are happy with your KantanTemplate click on the ‘Create’ button.
  • The ‘Create New Template Wizard’ will now automatically close and you will be directed back to the ‘My Templates’ page where you will be able to view your KantanTemplate.

Video

Below is a short YouTube video that provides a step by step process on how to create KantanTemplates.

How to use a KantanTemplate

      1. Click on the ‘KantanMT’ tab and select ‘My Client Profiles’ from the dropdown menu.
      2. You will be directed to the ‘My Client Profiles’ page. You will be in the ‘Client Profiles’section of the ‘My Client Profiles’ page. The last profile you were working on will be‘Active’.
      3. If you wish to add a ‘Template’ to another profile other than the ‘Active’ profile. Click on the profile you wish to add the ‘Template’ to, then click on the ‘Templates’ tab.
      4. Click the ‘Add’ button. The ‘Add Template’ wizard will now pop up on your screen.
      5. Select the template you wish to use from the ‘Available Templates’ drop down list
      6. Quick Tip: You can only select a Template who’s ‘Source’ and ‘Target’ language is the same as the ‘Source’ and ‘Target’ language of the ‘Active Profile’ e.g. If the source and target language of your profile was English to French, you can only select a Template which has the source and target language of English to French or French to English.

      7. Once you have selected your ‘Template’ click the ‘Add Template’ button.
      8. The ‘Add Template’ wizard will now automatically close and you will be directed back to the ‘Templates’ page where you will be able to view and use your.

Quick Tip: ‘My Templates’ from the drop down menu of the ‘KantanMT’ tab provides a view of ALL your KantanTemplates, while the ‘Templates’ tab on the ‘My Client Profiles’page provides a view of all KantanTemplates of the ‘ACTIVE PROFILE’ (i.e. the templates of the profile in use)

To learn more about KantanTemplates or get help with KantanMT technologies, please contact us at info@kantanmt.com. Hear from the Development team on why KantanTemplates allow members to quickly deploy KantanMT engines.