How Will the U.S. Election Affect Translation Industry?

Presidential Election 2016 KantanMT

In the U.S., the number of people who speak a language other than English is believed to be at an all-time high. As of 2015, translation and interpretation service was predicted to be the fastest growing industry in the country by CareerBuilder, while the U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics predicted a 46% increase in translation job opportunities in the U.S. between 2012 and 2022.  However, all those positive predictions were before the U.S. Presidential Election of 2016. After a whirl-wind campaign, President Elect Donald Trump is all set to take up his Presidential Oath on 20 January, 2017. But what could this mean for those in the localization industry? Continue reading

What’s New in eCommerce in 2016? More Localization and Better Machine Translation

ECommerce_Whitepaper_KantanMT Download

If the post-Black Friday sales numbers are anything to go by, there’s no question any more that the face of eCommerce is changing, and with it, the brick-and-mortar retailers have started rethinking their business strategy. As this news piece about Scotland experiencing a major dip in shoppers goes on to prove, demand for online shopping will increase substantially in 2016. This in turn means that the need for content localization and translation for eTailers (online retailers) will be even more pressing during the coming new year. As the often quoted Common Sense Advisory report points out, 72.4% of consumers are more likely to buy from a site, which is in their native language.  Indeed, localization is no longer a good-to-have feature – it is now a must-have for all eCommerce businesses that aim to sell their products globally.

Chris Bishop, Managing Director of Microsoft Research, Cambridge, UK points out that “by 2026 we will have ubiquitous, human-quality translation among all European languages, thereby eliminating the language barrier throughout Europe.” Bishop’s prediction does not sound far off the mark at all when we take into account the fact that in the past ten years, Machine Translation (MT) has improved by leaps and bounds. Early MT was rules-based (RBMT) and required sets of linguistic rules, and it worked moderately well within a prescribed domain. However, this was resource intensive and cost prohibitive for many.

By 2026 we will have ubiquitous, human-quality translation among all European languages, thereby eliminating the language barrier throughout Europe

Chris Bishop, Managing Director of Microsoft Research, Cambridge, UK

The turning point for using MT in business came with the advent of the Internet, the SaaS model and the open source development model for software. These new changes in technology helped build the foundation for Statistical Machine Translation (SMT) research, and subsequently the open source development of the Moses Decoder. Moses enabled researchers and private companies to commercialise Statistical MT and develop it to the custom solutions it is today. The year of 2016 and beyond, will see further research in the fields of Natural Language Processing (NPL), Deep learning and machine learning, contributing directly to immense improvements in the fields of Custom MT.

The KantanMT Business Team published a new white paper, which provides an in depth understanding of how eTailers in 2016 will be affected by Machine Translation, and also goes on to discuss how Custom Machine Translation when compared to generic MT systems, will emerge as the clear winner in solving eTailing localization issues in the coming year.

Here are some of the highlights how MT will evolve in 2016 for eTailers:

  • eTailers will use a combination of only CMT or CMT and Human Post-Editing to reach new markets ahead of their competitors
  • With increased multilingual customer demand for products, content translation will find support in auto scaling
  • Custom Machine Translation will be used more widely as eCommerce customers expand globally

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Summary:

Machine Translation is no longer a luxury. It is an essential component as a Tier 1 application to support global business. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how Machine Translation and more importantly Custom Machine Translation technology has come of age, in terms of quality, speed and scalability. During 2016 and beyond eTailers need to ensure that they review their globalization strategies to reflect these advances in technology, so they can maximise their global growth potential.

Download the KananMT white paper on eCommerce today!

eComm_whitepaper_calltoaction

Tips for Training Post-editors

A good quality Machine Translation engine relies on the quality of the bilingual data used to train it. For most MT users, this bilingual data can be translated by humans, or it can be fully post-edited MT output. In both cases, the quality of the data will influence the engines quality. 
Selçuk Özcan, Transistent’s Co-founder will discuss the differences and give some tips for successful post-editing.Selçuk Özcan, Transistent’s Co-founder has given KantanMT permission to publish his blog post on Translation Quality. This post was originally published in Dragosfer and on the GALA Blog website.

We have entered a new age, and a new technology has come into play: Machine Translation (MT). It’s globally accepted that MT systems dramatically increase productivity but it’s a hard struggle to integrate this technology into your production process. Apart from handling the engine building and optimizing procedures, you have to transform your traditional workflow:

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The traditional roles of the linguists (translators, editors, reviewers etc.) are reconstructed and converged to find a suitable place in this new, innovative workflow. The emerging role is called ‘post-edit’ and the linguists assigned to this role are called ‘post-editors’. You may want to recruit some willing linguists for this role, or persuade your staff to adopt a different point of view. But whatever the case may be, some training sessions are a must.

What are covered in training sessions?

1. Basic concepts of MT systems

Post-editors should have a notion of the dynamics of MT systems. It is important to focus on the system that is utilized (RBMT/SMT/Hybrid). For widely used SMT systems, it’s necessary for them to know:

  • how the systems behave
  • the functions of the Translation Model and Language Model*
  • input (given set of data) and output (raw MT output) relationship
  • what changes in different domains

* It’s not a must to give detailed information about that topics but touching on the issue will make a difference in determining the level of technical backgrounds of candidates. Some of the candidates may be included in testing team.

2. The characteristics of raw MT output

Post-editors should know the factors affecting MT output. On the other hand, the difference between working on fuzzy TM systems and with SMT systems has to be mentioned during a proper training session. Let’s try to figure out what to be given:

  • MT process is not the ‘T’ of the TEP workflow and raw MT output is not the target text expected to be output of ‘T’ process.
  • In the earlier stages of SMT engines, the output quality varies depending on the project’s dynamics and errors are not identical. As the system improves quality level becomes more even and consistent within the same domain.
  • There may be some word or phrase gaps in the systems’ pattern mappings. (Detecting these gaps is one of the main responsibilities of testing team but a successful post-editor must be informed about the possible gaps.)

3. Quality issues

This topic has two aspects: defining required target (end product) quality, and evaluation and estimation of output quality. The first one gives you the final destination and the second one makes you know where you are.

Required quality level is defined according to the project requirements but it mostly depends on target audience and intended usage of the target text. It seems similar to the procedure in TEP workflow. However, it’s slightly different; engine improvement plan should also be considered while defining the target quality level. Basically, this parameter is classified into two groups: publishable andunderstandable quality.

Evaluation and estimation aspect is a little bit more complicated. The most challenging factor is standardizing measurement metrics. Besides, the tools and systems used to evaluate and estimate the quality level have some more complex features. If you successfully establish your quality system, then adversities become easier to cope with.

It’s post-editors’duty to apprehend the dynamics of MT quality evaluation, and the distinction between MT and HT quality evaluation procedures. Thus, they are supposed to be aware of the expected error patterns. It will be more convenient to utilize the error categorization with your well-trained staff (QE staff and post-editors).

4. Post-editing Technique

The fourth and the last topic is the key to success. It covers appropriate method and principles, as well as the perspective post-editors usually acquire. Post-edit technique is formed using the materials prepared for the previous topics and the data obtained from the above mentioned procedures, and it is separately defined for almost every individual customized engines.

The core rule for this topic is that post-edit technique, as a concept, is likely to be definitely differentiated from traditional edit and/or review technique(s). Post-editors are likely to be capable of:

  • reading and analyzing the source text, raw MT output and categorized and/or annotated errors as a whole.
  • making changes where necessary.
  • considering the post-edited data as a part of data set to be used in engine improvement, and performing his/her work accordingly.
  • applying the rules defined for the quality expectation levels.

As briefly described in topic #3, the distance between the measured output quality and required target quality may be seen as the post-edit distance. It roughly defines the post-editor’s tolerance and the extent to which he/she will perform his work. Other criterion allowing us to define the technique and the performance is the target quality group. If the target text is expected to be of publishable quality then it’s called full post-edit and otherwise light post-edit. Light & full post-edit techniques can be briefly defined as above but the distinction is not always so clear. Besides, under/over edit concepts are likely to be included to above mentioned issues. You may want to include some more details about these concepts in the post-editor training sessions; enriching the training materials with some examples would be a great idea!

About Selçuk Özcan

Selçuk Özcan has more than 5 years’ experience in the language industry and is a co-founder of Transistent Language Automation Services. He holds degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Translation Studies and has a keen interest in linguistics, NLP, language automation procedures, agile management and technology integration. Selçuk is mainly responsible for building high quality production models including Quality Estimation and deploying the ‘train the trainers’ model. He also teaches Computer-aided Translation and Total Quality Management at the Istanbul Yeni Yuzyil University, Translation & Interpreting Department.

Transistent Partner PR Image 320x320

 

Read More about KantanMT’s Partnership with Transistent in the official News Release, or if you are interested in joining the KantanMT Partner Program, contact Louise (info@kantanmt.com) for more details on how to get involved. 

 

 

Language Industry Interview: A Chat with Deepan Patel from Milengo

Deepan croppedKantanMT caught up with Milengo’s Machine Translation Solutions Architect, Deepan Patel earlier this week for a quick chat about his experience using machine translation. Next Month, Deepan will be joining Tony O’Dowd in a free live webinar, to talk about how Milengo maximized it’s ROI for machine translation.

KantanMT: Can you tell me a little about yourself and, how you got involved in the industry?

Deepan Patel: To be honest, I sort of fell into the localization industry but I am certainly very glad that I did! I am a Modern Languages graduate from the University of Oxford which provided a very traditional approach to translation, certainly a million miles away from the realities of life in the localization industry.

I moved to Berlin after graduating in late 2008 and within a year I was fortunate enough to be accepted on a trainee program by my current employer Milengo Ltd, a language services provider which was founded in 2005. The first ever project I ever worked on was one that involved the customization of statistical machine translation (SMT) engines for a customer wishing to test the long-term viability of incorporating machine translation and post-editing into their localization operations.

It was a tremendous experience for both myself and Milengo; it was really that initial project that has laid the foundations for the MT-related services that we now offer. The main focus of my work at Milengo relates to testing and deploying customized machine translation and post-editing workflows for clients requiring a completely outsourced MT solution.

KMT: How has MT affected or changed your business models at Milengo?

DP: I believe that having machine translation and post-editing as part of our service spectrum has lent us a significant competitive advantage. This was very apparent in September last year when we were approached by an eCommerce company with quite a formidable challenge: namely, they had 19 days in which to launch a new web shop for Sweden and around  780,000 words that needed to be localized from Danish into Swedish. And of course they had a very tight budget!

Through the experiences that we have gained running large-scale machine translation and post-editing projects over the years, we were able to confidently provide a compelling MT-based workflow solution which fell within our client’s budget and would deliver high-quality translated content before their launch date. When providing their reasons for choosing us as for that project, it was our confidence in stating that we could deliver in time that was the main factor. Without our experience with machine translation, we would not have been able to win that project – it is as simple as that. We were able to deliver high-quality localized content within budget and before the initial deadline request. And now we enjoy regular work from this client, localizing all the updates to their product descriptions across three language pairs.

So in essence, MT has enabled us to win those large-scale projects where customer budgets are limited, turnaround time is crucial but quality expectations are high, that we may not have stood a favourable chance of winning previously.

KMT: How do you use machine translation for your clients?

DP: When answering this question I must take pains to emphasize that our MT service offerings always involve post-editing. For one of our clients within the IT domain, we localize the online help to their software products across five language pairs using customized engines that have been built using their own language assets. The requirement there is to deliver high-quality localized content at a significant cost reduction to a human-only translation model. For this particular customer we have achieved cost savings of between 27 – 40 % depending on the language pair.

For another of our clients within the automotive sector, we have built custom MT systems across 3 language pairs to provide a cost-effective but high-quality localization solution for their huge volume of parts data. The initial challenge presented to us was to localize around 300,000 words of this data within a fairly tight timeframe – though not as challenging as our eCommerce client! We were first able to demonstrate the viability of customized machine translation and post-editing for this type of content via our free Machine Translation and Post-editing (MT-PE) feasibility study, after which point we deployed our workflow solution for their three requested target languages. Again for this customer, we have implemented cost savings of between 25 – 40% when compared to the traditional translation model and are enjoying continued business from them.

The third main scenario where we apply MT-PE is for our eCommerce client that I mentioned in my response to your previous question. They add new products to their web shop on a weekly basis and their very repetitive product descriptions need to be localized as soon as possible, so the content can go “live” on the different language sites. Together with this customer we are now focusing on automating as much of the project process as possible with regard to transfer of content via API connectors and using our customized MT systems as a fully-integrated part of their localization project workflow.

For all of these clients, we have been able to offer tiered-pricing packages based on the premise that the more content that we post-edit and feed back into their MT systems during re-training cycles, the better the system will perform on future projects. Consequently we can offer lower rates for localization at defined intervals. Really it is all about being able to demonstrate the long-term cost-savings possible with a customized MT-PE solution.

KMT: What advice can you give to translation buyers, interested in implementing a machine translation workflow strategy?

DP: Well, firstly I would encourage translation buyers to evaluate whether they have the time, budget  and most importantly the relevant personnel within their organization to develop a custom MT solution, or whether it would make sense to turn to external help in the form of MT tech providers like KantanMT, or LSPs such as Milengo who would additionally be able to provide post-editing solutions as well.

I would also encourage translation buyers to evaluate how MT can be applied in different usage scenarios. For example, it would certainly be worth investigating MT-PE for large volume, highly repetitive content (user manuals, support documentation, catalogue data) where you can achieve significant cost-savings and quicker turnaround without compromise on the language quality (with excellent post-editors of course). Another worthwhile scenario for MT would be if your company produces a lot of short life-cycle or customer support content which needs to be available in the languages of your customers as quickly possible, and where transfer of meaning takes precedence over linguistic quality.

Thirdly I would ask the respective translation buyer to examine the state and volume of any language assets that they can use for customizing MT systems. Do you have enough of a training corpus to build MT systems which produce good quality MT output? Have your language assets been maintained well enough to ensure as much consistency in translation as possible? Remember that an MT system will only ever be as good as the material you use to train it. Again here external help may be useful in terms of applying data cleaning and normalization to the training corpus before you get round to building your MT systems.

Finally, I would always advise prospective translation buyers to consider the wider impact benefits of incorporating MT into their localization practices. The more you make use of your custom MT systems and more post-edited content you incorporate into system re-training cycles, the better your systems will perform. This of course leads to greater productivity benefits and reduced costs for localization. Which in turn means that you should free up more of your budget to turn your attentions towards localizing content that was previously considered too cost-prohibitive.

Maximizing ROI webinar KantanMTThank you Deepan, for taking time out of your busy schedule to take part in this interview, and we look forward to hearing more from you in KantanMT’s upcoming partner webinar. The webinar, Maximizing ROI for Machine Translation will be held on Wed, Mar 11, 2015 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM GMT.

Register for Webinar

3 Steps to Integrating SDL Trados Studio with KantanMT

SDLSDL Trados Studio is one of the most popular Computer Aided Translation (CAT) tools available on the market today, and is used by thousands of Language Service Providers (LSPs) and Translators worldwide.

To accommodate the high numbers of SDL Trados Studio users, the KantanMT development team released a new and improved KantanAPI Connector™, which is compatible with the latest versions of SDL Trados Studio (2011, 2014). The beauty of using this connector means you can quickly and easily configure both your SDL Trados Studio account and your KantanMT account, so there is a straightforward and seamless integration between both platforms.

As a member of the KantanMT Community, using SDL Trados Studio 2011 or 2014 you can launch and shutdown your KantanMT engines and retrieve translations on demand via the API from your KantanMT account, all you need to provide is your KantanMT account name, token and profile.

Once you have your KantanAPI Connector™ token, it’s a simple three step process to set up the integration.

Integrating SDL Trados Studio with KantanMT

Step 1: Login to the SDL Open Exchange App Store and Download the Installer

To download the app you will need a valid SDL Trados Studio license. Login to the SDL Translationzone App store using the same email address and password you use for SDL Trados Studio.

Step 2: Launch SDL Trados Studio

As soon as you have downloaded and installed the SDL Trados Studio installer from SDL’s Translationzone, you will need to launch Trados Studio.

Step 3: Select and Run the KantanAPI Connector

The KantanAPI Connector™ will appear in the list of plugins available for download, making it very straightforward to input your API token and select the profile that you want to use. The connector is completely free to download and requires the .NET Framework 3.5 to run correctly.

By using SDL Trados Studio you can easily access the KantanMT features available within the SDL Trados Studio interface based on your KantanMT subscription plan.

KantanAPI Connector Token

What do I do if I don’t have a KantanAPI Connector™ token?

Simply contact the KantanMT Sales Team (sales@kantanmt.com) to get your unique KantanAPI Connector token.

About KantanAPI Connector™ v2.0

The KantanAPI Connector™ allows you, and other members of the KantanMT Community to interact with the cloud based MT platform; KantanMT.com. You can submit individual segments or groups of segments for translation, and receive those translations immediately. The API operates as a REST web service, this means that a client program needs only to be able to perform HTTP GET requests to interact with the API. So, the API is not limited to interacting with clients developed using a particular programming language or operating system.

Read the press release: KantanMT Announces Faster SDL Trados Studio 2011 and 2014 Integration

Product Sheet: KantanAPI Connector™

Download the Trados 2015 Plugin

The KantanMT Team would love to hear about your experience using the KantanMT/SDL Trados Studio connector. Please send your feedback or questions to Louise (louisei@kantanmt.com).

Scalability or Quality – Can we have both?

KantanMT Engine optimization, machine translationThe ‘quality debate’ is old news and the conversation, which is now heavily influenced by ‘big data’ and ‘cloud computing’ has moved on. Instead it is focusing on the ability to scale translation jobs quickly and efficiently to meet real-time demands.

Translation buyers expect a system or workflow that provides high quality, fit-for-purpose translations. And it’s because of this that Language Service Providers (LSPs) have worked tirelessly, perfecting their systems and orchestrating the use of Translation Memories (TM) within well managed workflows that combine the professionalization of the translator industry – quality is now a given in the buyers eyes.

What is the translation buyers’ biggest challenge?

The Translation buyers’ biggest challenge now is scale – scaling their processes, their workflows and supply chains. Of course, the caveat is that they want scale without jeopardizing quality! They need systems that are responsive, are transparent and scale gracefully in step with their corporate growth and language expansion strategy.

Scale with quality! One without the other is as useless as a wind-farm without wind!

What makes machine translation better than other processes? Looking past the obvious automation of the localization workflow, the one thing that MT can do above all other translation methods is its ability to combine automation and scalability.

KantanAutoScale, KantanMT product, machine translationKantanMT recognizes this and has developed a number of key technologies to accelerate the speed of on-demand MT engines without compromising quality.

  • KantanAutoScale™ is an additional divide and conquer feature that lets KantanMT users distribute their translation jobs across multiple servers running in the cloud.
  • Engine Optimization technology means KantanMT engines now operate 5-10 times faster, reducing the amount of memory and CPU power needed so MT jobs can be processed faster and are more efficiently when using features like KantanAutoScale.
  • API optimization, KantanMT engineers went back to basics, reviewing and refining the system, which enabled users to achieve improvements from 50-100% performance in translation speed.  This meant translation jobs that took five hours can now be completed in less than one hour.

Scalability is the key to advancement in machine translation, and considering the speed at which people are creating and digesting content we need to be able to provide true MT scalability to all language pairs for all content.

KantanMT’s Tony O’Dowd and bmmt’s Maxim Khalilov will discuss the scalability challenge and more, in a free webinar for translation buyers; 5 Challenges of Scaling Localization Workflows in the 21st Century on Thursday November 20th at 4pm GMT, 5pm CET, 8am PST.

KantanMT and bmmt webinar presenters Tony O'Dowd and Maxim Khalilov

To hear more about optimizing or improving the scalability of your engine please contact Louise Irwin (louisei@kantanmt.com).

KantanMT @tekom Trade Fair and tcworld 2014

The KantanMT team are excited to be exhibiting for the first time at the tekom Trade Fair and tcword conference. This year, the event has found a new home at the International Congress Centre (ICS) Messe Stuttgart. This event, which is the largest of its kind is the biggest market place for technical communication in the world.

Not only will the KantanMT flag be flying high at the largest global TC event. But, KantanMT will also be taking part in sessions, tool presentations and offering personalized demos throughout the conference week. KantanMT are also offering its members a complimentary ticket to the tekom Fair with their registration.

KantanMT tekom trade fair, tcworld
Email us if you still need to get your free ticket (louisei@kantanmt.com)

Session: How does your machine Translation system measure up?

Tony O’Dowd, Founder and Chief Architect will be giving a presentation on evaluating machine translation. The presentation; ‘How does your machine Translation system measure up?’ is for localization professionals and will cover some of the most common yet critical issues for users of machine translation:

  • Measuring performance of Statistical MT
  • Recent advances in MT and data visualization techniques
  • Tracking MT efficiency in the translation process

Find it

What: Session

Where: Room C7.1OG

When: Wednesday 12th November @16:00 – 16:45

 

Joint Tool Presentation – Machine Translation for Translation Buyers: What is available and what is expected!

On the following day, KantanMT will be taking part in a joint tool presentation with German Language Service Provider (LSP) bmmt. Tony O’Dowd and Maxim Khalilov from bmmt will discussmachine translation for translation buyers: what is available and what is expected’. In this presentation, Tony and Maxim will give an overview of the current post-edited MT landscape and discuss with examples the formula for successful MT adoption, as well as what tools are available for global translation buyers. The full tool presentation program is available online on the tekom website.

Find it

What: Tool Presentation

Where: Room C10.1

When: Thursday 13th November @ 11:15 – 12:00

KantanMT_tcw-conference2014_Exhibitor

Personalized Platform Demonstrations

At the KantanMT exhibition booth, the KantanMT team will be giving personalized platform demonstrations that provide an ‘under the bonnet’ look at the cloud-based platform. The booth will be located in Hall C2 at booth A10, right next to bmmt; German LSP and KantanMT preferred partner.

Find it:

What: Personalized Platform Demonstrations

Where: KantanMT exhibition booth Hall C2, booth A10

When: Tuesday 11th – Thursday 13th November

 

Get the most out of the tekom/tcword conference – meet the teams

Large conferences and events can often be overwhelming and it’s easy to lose track of time and get wrapped up in the buzz and excitement of the event. To make sure you get the most from the conference, keep organized and make an appointment to speak with a member of the KantanMT or bmmt team.

KantanMT team – contact Louise Irwin (louisei@kantanmt.com)

Bmmt team – contact Peggy Lindner (peggy.lindner@bmmt.eu)

See you in Stuttgart!

5 Reasons to Read the TAUS Review

Earlier this month, TAUS, a well-known industry think tank and resource centre for the language services industry launched its quarterly publication; the TAUS review. The new magazine with a mission is dedicated to;

“Making translation technology more prominent and mainstream throughout the globe to break language barriers and improve worldwide communication.”

KantanMT TAUS Review

KantanMT identified five key reasons that make the review an invaluable asset to any translation and localization professional. It’s thanks to these reasons that KantanMT will distribute the TAUS Review right here on the KantanMTblog.

1. Global Translation Industry news 

TAUS has mobilized writers from across the globe; Africa, Americas, Asia and Europe to discuss different trends and technologies in the language services industry. These articles can become a great reference tool for those interested in how language technologies are advancing. In this issue; Andrew Joscelyne reports from Europe; Brian McConnell gives updates from the Americas; Asian trends are covered by Mike Tian-Jian Jiang and Amlaku Eshetie reports from the southern hemisphere; Africa.

2. Research and Reports 

Recent Research in MT is pretty exciting stuff, those that consider themselves language industry veterans like Luigi Muzii remember a time when machine translation predictions were overestimated. But what was once an unrealistic assumption is now changing as “neural networks and big data” are bringing a new frontier to natural language processing. Luigi Muzii gives an overview of the ‘research perspective’, highlighting current trends in research and linking to some interesting ACL winning papers, which introduce MT decoders that do not need linguistic resources.

3. Unique Insights

TAUS Review offers unique insights into the translation industry by incorporating use cases and perspectives from four different personas; the researcher, the journalist, the translator and the language expert, each one with their own different views and opinions on the importance of global communication and breaking down language barriers. In this issue, Jost Zetzsche, Nicholas Ostler, Lane Greene, and Luigi Muzii share their perspectives.

KantanMT especially enjoyed  Jost Zetzsche’s view of making “machine translation translator-centric” where the translator is at the centre of the MT workflow. One of the examples he lists for making this possible, “dynamic improvements in MT systems” is available to KantanMT clients.

4. Language Technology Community 

The opinions and thoughts that come from each contributor are neatly wrapped in one accessible place, and when coupled with the directory of distributors, events and webinars make a very useful resource for any small business or language technology enthusiast. Keep an eye out for some very interesting post-editing and MT quality webinars planned for November.

5. It’s Free! 

Holding true to the concept of sharing information and making translation technology more prominent and mainstream throughout the globe, the review is available quarterly and completely free for its readers, making it accessible to anyone, anywhere regardless of their budget.

Scroll to the end of the page to find the TAUS review on the KantanMTBlog.

Translation Technology Conferences and Events for 2014

KantanMT events2014 has arrived – and there is no better way to get the ball rolling than by planning what events to attend. Over the next twelve months there is a vast selection of conferences, unconferences, workshops, roundtables, webinars and other events planned around the world.

It was hard to narrow the list of everything going on, so KantanMT tried to focus on events that were related to Machine Translation and the Natural Language Processing (NLP) industry, localization, translation technologies and post-editing. Some of the events are more academic, while others are more business orientated.

Unconferences and Conferences…

We added some ‘unconferences’ to the list, these are the opposite of conferences. Unconferences are peer-to-peer interactions on topics chosen by participants at the beginning of a session, unlike more formal conferences. Unconference participants choose the topics, so it is much easier to promote an open discussion and are a good way for industry professionals to get together in an informal setting, sharing their own challenges and solutions.

Localization World, one of the biggest industry conferences, has had a great response from holding unconferences alongside its traditional conferences and the Association of Language Companies (ALC) also endorses the value of unconferences. The next ALC unconference will held in the early part of February.

Hopefully, this list will be a useful resource in deciding what events and conferences to visit during 2014. You may have registered for some of these events already, if not, then now is the time to start filling in your calendar. If you know of a relevant conference or event we missed, please add it to the comment section at the bottom of this post.

2014 Listings

January

Jan 8, 2014 (17:00-18:00 CET)

Webinar: TAUS Translation Technology Showcase – XTRF and Kilgray’s memoQ

Tomasz Mróz, XTRF Operations Director will present usage scenarios on integrating XTRF technology into the translation workflows, TM integration and faster project turnaround times. István Lengyel, CEO of Kilgray will also be presenting on memoQ, a cloud-based translation technology platform for translation management.


Jan 9, 2014

Webinar:  TAUS Dynamic Quality Framework Users Call

The users call is a bi-monthly webinar where TAUS members discuss solutions for measuring Machine Translation quality. Some of the participants include; Autodesk, CA Technologies, Cisco, Dell, Digital Linguistics, eBay, EMC and Google. To register for the webinar, members can email memberservices@taus.net


Jan 15, 2014

Webinar: The Convergence Era: Translation as A Utility (The Content Wrangler, TAUS)

This webinar, hosted by BrightTalk is a discussion by Jaap van der Meer (TAUS) and Scott Abel (The Content Wrangler) on how translation has become a necessary part of everyday life, the same way as electricity, water and the internet have become indispensable.


Jan 16, 2014

Meeting/Webinar: L20n: Next Generation Localization Framework for the Web, The International Multilingual Computing User Group (IMUG), San José, California USA

Zbigniew Braniecki, Software Engineer, Mozilla Corporation will speak about L20n, a new localization framework that isolates localization and enables translators to give naturally expressive translations for even the most complex user interfaces. Mozilla is investing in moving its products – Firefox, Firefox OS, and Firefox for Android – to this new architecture.


Jan 23, 2014

Unconference: Localization Unconference, Achievers Head office Toronto, Canada

This unconference is an all-day event starting at 09:30am and will cover internationalization and localization topics. It is organized by Jenny Reid, Localization Project Manager, BlackBerry; Oleksandr Pysaryuk, Localization Manager, Achievers; and Richard Sikes, Principal Consultant, Localization Flow Technologies.


Jan 30, 2014 (11:00 EST/17:00 CET)

Webinar: Integrating Your Content Platform, Globalization and Localization Association

Anders Holt, European Director and Robert Timms, Technical Director at translate plus will present a webinar on integrating content management platforms; CMS, DMS, PIM or e-procurement system into the translation workflow. They will discuss the integration methods available and how to get the best results and benefits of integration.


Jan 30-31, 2014

Conference: 2014 CRITT – WCRE Conference, Translation in transition: between cognition, computing and technology, Copenhagen Business School (CBS), Frederiksberg, Denmark

This academic conference presents research from the centre for research and innovation in translation and translation technology (CRITT). The program covers a variety of topics including; translation and cognitive processes, translation and translation theory and observations about Machine Translation and translation and post-editing.


February

Feb 5, 2014 (17:00-18:00 CET)

Webinar: TAUS Translation Technology Showcase – Ontram and Across Language Server v6

Christian Weih, Chief Sales Officer from Across Systems presents a TMS platform that integrates all aspects of the translation workflow.


Feb 6-8, 2014

Unconference: ALC Unconference, (Association of Language Companies), Palm Beach Gardens, Florida USA

The Unconference is geared towards language company owners and senior members of staff who get together without any formal presentation structure for more intimate brainstorming and discussion sessions in a casual and relaxed environment.


Feb 6, 2014 (11:00 EST/17:00 CET)

Webinar: Maximizing Translation Efficiency: Best QA Practices for Large Multi-channel Publishing Projects

Jose Sermeno, Product Evangelist at MadCap Software and Peter Argondizzo, Translation and Localization PM at MadTranslations discuss QA best practices that will make projects more efficient.


Feb 24-26, 2014

Conference: ‘Localization in a Shifting Global Economy’ Localization World, Bangkok Thailand

The first of three Localization World conferences of 2014, Localization World is the leading conference for international business, translation and localization providing opportunities for networking and information exchange.


Feb 26-28, 2014

Conference, workshops:  ICC (Intelligent Content Conference) 2014, San José, California USA

ICC focuses on the creation and management of content in different languages on any device. The topics that will include; content strategy, content marketing, content engineering, structured content, ebooks, mobile, apps, adaptive content, automated translation, terminology management, big data and analytics.


Feb 27, 2014 (11:00 EST/17:00 CET)

Webinar: GALA Translation Project Management with memoQ Server Training session

Daniel Zielinski will explain how the memoQ server can be used for managing translation projects effectively. See the different types of projects and workflows supported, and learn how to set up, prepare, monitor and complete a translation project with the memoQ server.


Feb 27 – Mar 1, 2014

Conference: memoQfest Americas, Kilgray Translation Technologies, Los Angeles, California USA

This three day event is hosted by Kilgray Translation Technologies and is aimed at freelance language professionals, LSPs and corporate translation users. The conference gives an overview of translation technology and how it can be integrated into businesses.


March

Mar 3-6, 2014

Conference: WritersUA, the conference for Software User Assistance, Palm Springs, California USA

This conference is for those involved in creating user assistance content. There will be a variety of presentations focused on developing content strategies, key technologies and tools that are used to create well-designed interfaces, technical communications and support information.


Mar 5, 2014 (17:00-18:00 CET)

Webinar: TAUS Translation Technology Showcase – Safaba and KantanMT

The theme of this webinar is the application and influence of MT technologies on global business. Tony O’Dowd, Founder and Chief Architect presents the KantanMT.com cloud-based platform introducing some of the KantanMT technologies and usage cases, including; KantanWatch, KantanISR, KantanAnalytics, TotalRecall, PEX and GENTRY.

Udi Hershkovich, Vice President of Business Development at Safaba will discuss key business imperatives for businesses and how Enterprise MT removes the language barriers that face global businesses.


Mar 13-14, 2014

Conference: International Conference on Translation and Accessibility in Video Games and Virtual Worlds at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain

The conference is a meeting point for academics, professionals and students involved in the game localization industry. The conference aims to foster the interdisciplinary debate in these fields, combine them as academic areas of research and contribute to the development of best practices.


Mar 17-21, 2014

Conference: Game Localization Summit at GDC, IGDA Game Localization SIG, San Francisco, California USA

The game Localization Summit at GDC is supported and organized by the IGDA Game Localization SIG, and it is aimed at helping localization professionals as well as the entire community of game developers and publishers understand how to plan and execute game localization and culturalization as a part of the development cycle. There are other GDC conferences planned for Europe and China later in the year.


Mar 23-26, 2014

Conference: GALA 2014, Globalization and Localization Association (GALA), Istanbul, Turkey

The annual GALA conference brings together localization industry professionals for networking opportunities and peer-to-peer learning of the latest technologies and emerging trends in localization, language and translation technology.


Mar 28-29, 2014

Conference: The Translation and Localization Conference, Localize.pl, TexteM, KOMTE, Warsaw, Poland

This is an annual international event focusing on the latest technologies and localization industry trends. The conference is suited to LSPs and freelance translators, and covers technical communication and implications for the translation industry. Big data vs. the translation industry; CAT tools, MT, cloud computing, project management and the human factor; recruitment and training.


April

Apr 2, 2014 (17:00-18:00 CET)

Webinar: Translation Technology Showcase, TAUS – tauyou and Pangeanic

Diego Bartolome, CEO tauyou will discuss the ‘Big Data’ approach to SMT and the importance of clean data on output quality.


Apr 10-11, 2014

Event: TAUS Executive Forum, Oracle Japan, Tokyo, Japan

The executive forum consists of two-days of meetings for buyers and providers of language services and technologies. It is an open exchange about language business innovation and translation technology with the theme ‘translation as a utility’. Topics to be covered include; translation data, MT showcases, DQF evaluation, translation customer support and integration with CRM systems.


Apr 13-15, 2014

Conference: MadWorld 2014, MadCap Software, Inc., San Diego, California USA

Designed to cater for technical writers, documentation managers and content strategists. This is the top conference for technical communication and content strategy.


Apr 25, 2014

Conference: TCeurope Colloquium, Conseil des Rédacteurs Techniques, Aix-en-Provence, France

Conference themes include; looking at the essential core skills of a technical communicator, accessibility and usability, technical communication and social media, multi‐authoring and international teamwork and training technical authors in the internet age.


Apr 26-30, 2014

Conference: EACL-2014, European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Gothenburg, Sweden

Available to all ACL members and covers research in computational linguistics, psycholinguistics, speech, information retrieval, multimodal language processing and language issues in emerging domains such as bioinformatics and social media. Workshops and tutorials are held during Saturday-Sunday April 26-27th, while the main conference is runs from Monday-Wednesday April 28th-30th.


May

May 7, 2014 (17:00-18:00 CET)

Webinar: Translation Technology Showcase, TAUS – TaaS and Interverbum

TaaS and Interverbum present in this month’s Translation Technology Showcase by TAUS.


May 7-9, 2014

Conference: memoQfest International, Kilgray Translation Technologies, Budapest, Hungary

This conference aims to set up a forum where companies, LSPs and translators can discuss workflows and best practices that relate to memoQ or translation technology in general. Attendees will discuss industry trends attend workshops and exchange information with translators, LSPs, and translation end users.


May 7-8, 2014

Workshop: Making the Multilingual Web Work, MultilingualWeb, Madrid, Spain

The workshop is supported by the LIDER project and aims to survey and share information about best practices and standards for promoting multilingualism on the web.


May 8-9, 2014

Conference: Intelligent Content – Life Sciences and Healthcare, the Rockley Group, the Content Wrangler, San Francisco, California USA

The event will showcase examples, standards, methods, strategies and tools needed to help pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers, and healthcare firms deliver the right information, in the right language, on any device. Conference topics include; mhealth, ehealth, digital health, personalized healthcare content and advanced translation technologies.


May 17-18, 2014

Conference: UTIC 2014, Ukrainian Translation Industry Conference, Kiev, Ukraine

Translators, managers, educators and software developers get together for networking opportunities and to discuss future industry trends.


May 18-21, 2014

Conference: Technical Communication Summit 2014, Society for Technical Communication, Phoenix, Arizona USA

The Technical Communication Summit is a source of learning for professional technical communicators giving training on the latest communication techniques, publishing technologies and business trends in the industry.


May 18-21, 2014

Conference: ALC 2014 Annual Conference, Association of Language Companies, Palm Springs, California USA

This conference is a networking event for anyone doing business with LSPs, combining educational content and networking.


May 23, 2014

Roundtable: TAUS Translation Automation Roundtable, TAUS, Moscow, Russia

Hosted by ABBYY Language Services, is a meeting for buyers and providers of translation services. The participants will get a good insight into MT technology, customization, implementation requirements and business cases.


May 26-31, 2014

Conference: LREC 2014, the European Language Resource Association, Reykjavík, Iceland

LREC is focused on Language Resources (LRs) and Evaluation for Language Technologies (LT). The aim of LREC is to give an overview of LR and LTs, emerging trends and the exchange of information.


June

June 2-3, 2014

Event: TAUS Industry Leaders Forum 2014, Clontarf Castle Hotel, Dublin

The theme for this meeting is ‘convergence’ with industry leaders discussing best practices, possible common approaches and shared services to optimize translation efficiencies through a series of short presentations.


Jun 3-4, 2014

Workshop: Localization Project Management Certification – The Localization Institute, Clarion Hotel, Dublin, Ireland

As part of the LPM Certification Program, this two-day project management training workshop will be held alongside Localization world. There is an eight week self-study part that must be completed before the workshop. It is open to Localization Project Managers with at least three years project management experience. Early bird and group registration discounts are available.


Jun 4-6, 2014

Conference: Localization World Dublin, Localization World Ltd., Dublin, Ireland

The second localization conference of 2014 will be held in Dublin with the theme of “disruptive innovation” and how this impacts the localization industry and the role of translators. Topics covered at the conference will include; advanced localization management, global business, localization core competencies and technology.


Jun 5-6, 2014

Conference: UA Europe 2013, UA Europe, Kraków, Poland

In association with Writers UA, the UA Europe technical communication conference focuses on software user assistance and online Help, and provides information on the latest industry trends, technical developments, and best practice in software UA.


Jun 16-18, 2014

Conference: EAMT 2014, European Association for Machine Translation, Dubrovnik, Croatia – 17th Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

The conference is aimed at anyone interested in MT and translation-related tools and resources. Topics will include; MT in multilingual public service (eGovernment etc.), MT for the web, MT embedded in other services, MT evaluation techniques and evaluation results and more.


August

Aug 23-29, 2014

Conference: COLING 2014, International Committee for Computational Linguistics, Dublin, Ireland

The bi-annual COLING conference, is one of the premier Natural Language Processing conferences in the world. The conference will include full papers, oral presentations, poster presentations, demonstrations, tutorials, and workshops on a variety of technical areas on natural language and computation.


September

Sep 25-26, 2014

Workshop: IATIS Regional Workshop, Translator and Interpreter Training, Serbia

This conference is aimed at promoting translator training, and will address training in areas such as field/domain specialization, technical skills (including pre-/post-editing of MT), revision skills and management skills (soft skills).


October

Oct 4-5, 2014

Conference: MedTranslate 2014, GxP Language Services, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany


Oct 6-7, 2014

Workshop: Localization Project Management Certification, the Localization Institute, Seattle, Washington USA

As part of the LPM Certification Program, this two-day project management training workshop will be held alongside Localization world.


Oct 19, 2014

Unconference: Localization World Unconference, Seattle

The agenda will be set in the first session and then there will be 3-4 break-out sessions with topics the group chose together. Attendees can submit topics to be considered from Wednesday, October 17th and can be submitted at VistaTEC’s booth.


Oct 27-28, 2014

Conference: TAUS User Conference, TAUS, Vancouver, Canada

The TAUS Annual Conference 2014 will be co-located with the Localization World Conference taking place in the Convention Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada.


Oct 29-31, 2014

Conference: Localization World Vancouver, Localization World Ltd., Vancouver, Canada

Localization World provides an opportunity for the exchange of information in the language and translation services and technologies market.


November

Nov 3-5, 2014

Conference: 38th Internationalization & Unicode Conference (IUC38), Object Management Group, Santa Clara, California USA

The conference is for internationalization experts, tools vendors, software implementers, and business and program managers who want to discuss the best methods for doing business in international markets. The conference will feature subject areas; cloud computing, upgrading to HTML5, integrating with social networking software, and implementing mobile apps.


Nov 5-8, 2014

Conference: 55th ATA Conference, American Translators Association, Sheraton Hotel Chicago, Illinois USA

A networking event for translators, project managers and industry professionals. The aim of the conference is to promote the professional development of translators and interpreters.


Nov 11-13, 2014

Conference:  tcworld – tekom, Stuttgart, Germany

The technical communication conference and trade fair examines different aspects of localization, internationalization and globalization. It is the largest technical communication, authoring and IT management conference in the world and participating companies offer industrial, software and services for technical communication.


December

Dec 8-12 2014

Conference: IEEE GLOBECOM, Austin Texas USA

The conference is the second largest of the 38 IEEE communications societies will focus on the latest advancements in broadband, wireless, multimedia, internet, image and voice communications.


Dec 15-18 2014

Conference: IEEE CloudCom 2014, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore

CloudCom promotes cloud computing platforms. It is co-sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Cloud Computing Association. The conference attracts researchers, developers, users, students and practitioners from the fields of big data, systems architecture, services research, virtualization, security and privacy and high performance computing.

KantanMT will look forward to meeting you at some of these conferences over the next year.

#T9n and the Computer

The 35th ASLIB conference opens today, Thursday 28th November and runs for two days in Paddington, London. The annual ‘Translating and the Computer Conference’ serves to highlight the importance of technology within the translation industry and to showcase new technologies available to localization professionals.KantanMT

KantanMT was keen to have a look at how technology has shaped the translation industry throughout history so we took a look at some of the translation technology milestones over the last 50 years.

The computer has had a long history, so it’s no surprise that developments in computer technology greatly affect how we communicate. Machine Translation research dates back to the early 1940s, although its development was stalled because of negative feedback regarding the accuracy of early MT output. The ALPAC (Automatic Language Processing Advisory Committee) report published in 1966, prompted researchers to look for alternative methods to automate the translation process.

1970’s

In terms of modern development, the real evolution of ‘translation and the computer’ began in the 1970s, when more universities started carrying out research and development on automated translation. At this point, the European Coal and Steel Community in Luxemburg and the Federal Armed Forces Translation Agency in Mannheim, Germany were already making use of text related glossaries and automatic dictionaries. It was also around this time that translators started to come together to form translation companies/language service providers who not only translated, but also took on project management roles to control the entire translation process.

Developing CAT tools

1980’s

Translation technology research gained momentum during the early 1980s as commercial content production increased. Companies in Japan, Canada and Europe who were distributing multilingual content to their customers, now needed a more efficient translation process. At this time, translation technology companies began developing and launching Computer Assisted Translation (CAT) technology.

Innovation, KantanMT-IconDutch company, INK was one of the first to release desktop translation tools for translators. These tools originally called INK text tools, sparked more research into the area. Trados, a German translation company, started reselling INK text tools and this led to the research and development of the TED translation editor, an initial version of the translator’s workbench.

1990’s

The 1990s were an exciting time for the translation industry. Translation activities that were previously kept separate from computer software development were now being carried out together in what was termed localization. The interest in localizing for new markets led to translation companies and language service providers merging both technology and translation services, becoming Localization Service Providers.

Trados launched their CAT tools in 1990, with Multiterm, for terminology management and the Translation Memory (TM) software Translators Workbench in 1994. ATRIL, Madrid launched a TM system in 1993 and STAR (Software, Translation, Artwork, Recording) also released Transit, a TM system in 1994. The ‘fuzzy match’ feature was also developed at this time and quickly became a standard feature of TM.

Increasingly, translators started taking advantage of CAT tools to translate more productively. This lead to a downward pressure on price, making translation services more competitive.

The Future…

As we move forward, technology continues to influence translation. Global internet diffusion has increased the level of global communication and has changed how we communicate. We can now communicate in real-time, on any device and through any medium. Technology will continue to develop, and become faster and more adaptive to multi-language users, and demand for real-time translation will drive the further developments in the areas of automated translation solutions.

Find out more about KantanMT’s Quality Estimation Technology, KantanAnalytics.